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Online Courses

First Session, 2021

AAAD 288 Black Popular Cultures: Global Scopes (3)

Through profound analysis of key aspects of black popular cultures in their global diversity, this course tackles fundamental questions about the meanings of black identity, identification, and belonging.

AMST 110 Introduction to the Cultures and Histories of Native North America (HIST 110) (3)

An interdisciplinary introduction to Native American history and studies. The course uses history, literature, art, and cultural studies to study the Native American experience.

ARAB 203 Intermediate Arabic I (4)

Prerequisite, ARAB 102. Third semester of Arabic language instruction, comprising both Modern Standard Arabic and one spoken dialect. Coursework includes expanded grammar and vocabulary, and culturally relevant activities. This intensive class will meet online via Zoom every day (MTWRF) from 9:45-12:45.

ARTH 242 Archaeology of Egypt (CLAR 242) (3)

MAYMESTER. A survey of the archaeological remains of ancient Egypt, from the earliest settlements of the Neolithic period until the end of the New Kingdom

ASIA 65 First-Year Seminar: Philosophy on Bamboo: Rethinking Early Chinese Thought (3)

This course will introduce students to the main works and themes in early Chinese thought from the earliest recorded writings down to the Qin unification in 221 BCE. This class will meet online via Zoom during its scheduled time (MTWRF 11:30-1), but will also offer alternatives for asynchronous learning to students unable to participate at the scheduled time.

ASIA 134 Modern East Asia (HIST 134) (PWAD 134) (3)

Comparative and interdisciplinary introduction to China and Japan in the 19th and 20th centuries, focusing on impact of the West, nation building, industrialization, and evolution of mass society.

ASIA 150 Asia: An Introduction (3)

MAYMESTER. The course introduces Asia’s historical, cultural, and political diversity by examining some of the global forces that have shaped Asian societies (e.g., colonialism, orientalism, and neoliberalism). This class will meet online via Zoom during its scheduled time (MTWRF 11:30-2:45), but will also offer alternatives for asynchronous learning to students unable to participate at the scheduled time.

ASIA 164 Music of South Asia (MUSC 164)(3)

This course provides a comprehensive overview of the music of South Asia, focusing on India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh. The entire spectrum of musical genres will be covered. This hybrid course will meet online via Zoom on Mondays 6:00-8:35 pm; the rest of the instruction will be asynchronous.

CHIN 101 Elementary Chinese I (4)

Introduction to Mandarin Chinese, focusing on pronunciation, simple conversation, and basic grammar. Reading and writing Chinese characters are also taught. Writing Chinese characters is required. Students may not receive credit for both CHIN 101 or CHIN 102 and CHIN 111. This intensive hybrid course will meet online via Zoom every day (MTWRF) from 1:15-3:15, and will have an hour’s worth of additional asynchronous learning activities every day.

CHIN 203 Intermediate Chinese I (4)

Prerequisite, CHIN 102. Second-year level of modern standard Chinese. Writing Chinese characters is required. This intensive hybrid course will meet online via Zoom every day (MTWRF) from 1:15-3:15, and will have an hour’s worth of additional asynchronous learning activities every day.

CHIN 255 Bandit or Hero: Outlawry in Chinese Literature and Films (3)

This course explores the idea of outlaws as hero in the 16th-century kung-fu novel Outlaws of the Marsh and its influence on modern kung-fu and gangster films. This is a completely asynchronous online course.

CHIN 361 Chinese Traditional Theater (3)

This course introduces traditional Chinese theater from its earliest development to modern times by examining the interrelation of its elements–music, dance, poetry, and illustration–with performance footage, visual art, and dramatic texts. This is a completely asynchronous online course.

CLAR 242 Archaeology of Egypt (ARTH 242) (3)

MAYMESTER. A survey of the archaeological remains of ancient Egypt, from the earliest settlements of the Neolithic period until the end of the New Kingdom.

CLAS 131 Classical Mythology (3)

An introduction to the mythology of the ancient Greek and Roman world. Readings may include selections from Homer, Hesiod, Greek tragedy, and Vergil.

CLAS 242 Sex and Gender in Antiquity (WGST 242) (3)

Exploration of gender constructs, what it meant to be a woman or a man, in antiquity, as revealed in literary, historical, and archaeological sources. Readings from Homer, Euripides, Plato, Ovid, Virgil, Juvenal, Petronius, and other ancient authors.

COMM 113 Public Speaking (3)

Theory and extensive practice in various types of speaking.

COMM 120 Introduction to Interpersonal and Organizational Communication (MNGT 120) (3)

An introduction to communication theory, research, and practice in a variety of interpersonal and organizational contexts. This course examines the role of communication in both personal and professional relationships.

COMM 130 Introduction to Media Production (3)

Permission of the instructor for non-majors. Prerequisite for all production courses. Introduces students to basic tools, techniques, and conventions of production in audio, video, and film.

COMM 150 Introduction to New Media Credits (3)

MAYMESTER. An introduction to the design, aesthetics, and analysis of various forms of digital media. Hands-on experience with different modes of creation, including graphics, web-based communication, and social media.

COMM 160 Introduction to Performance Studies (3)

As the introductory course in performance studies, students will explore and experiment with performance as ritual, performance in everyday life, and the performance of literature.

COMM 170 Rhetoric and Public Issues (3)

Examines the basic nature and importance of rhetoric and argumentation. Attention is devoted to interpreting the persuasive function of texts and their relation to modern forms of life.

COMM 249 Introduction to Communication Technology, Culture, and Society (3)

MAYMESTER. Historical exploration of the sociocultural import of communication technologies, from the introduction of the telegraph in the mid-1800s through current implications of the Internet and various digital devices.

COMM 422 Family Communication (3)

MAYMESTER. Prerequisite, COMM 120. Growth in technologies, more frequent travel, and movements of products and people across the borders of nation states change concepts of family and community. Foregrounded by these realities, this course combines theories of family and communication with documentation of lived experience to interrogate family communication patterns in contemporary culture.

DRAM 117 Perspectives in World Drama (3)

MAYMESTER. A survey of non-Western drama and theatre with emphasis on the historical and aesthetic development of those regions. This online course is designed to heighten awareness and appreciation for theater not rooted in European traditions. We will explore new dramatic forms and genres. The various cultural groups focused on in this course are those that you will encounter as you participate in a global community.

EDUC 181 Introduction to Human Development and Family Studies (3)

Introduces students to theories and major research areas in human development and family studies while connecting this theory and research to careers in the helping professions. Students shadow a professional in a field of their choice.

EDUC 526 Ethics and Education: From Global Problems to Classroom Dilemmas (3)

Among the topics examined are ethical implications of democratic schooling for a democratic society, educators as moral agents, and education as an institution with incumbent responsibilities. Students explore the explicit and implied ethics of education and schooling as they relate to policy makers, educators, and citizens concerned about social justice.

EDUC 689 Foundations of Special Education (3)

This course will provide an advanced introduction to key concepts, issues, and service delivery approaches pertaining to the educational needs of students with high incidence disabilities.

ENGL 105 English Composition and Rhetoric (3)

This college-level course focuses on written and oral argumentation, composition, research, information literacy, and rhetorical analysis. The course introduces students to the specific disciplinary contexts for written work and oral presentations required in college courses. Students may not receive credit for both ENGL 102 and ENGL 102I, 105, or 105I.

ENGL 128 Major American Authors (3)

MAYMESTER. A study of approximately six major American authors drawn from Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne, Melville, Stowe, Whitman, Clemens, Dickinson, Chesnutt, James, Eliot, Stein, Hemingway, O’Neill, Faulkner, Hurston, or others.
The United States was founded through dissent, and the tradition of collective action has shaped the country and its literature ever since. This course will focus on major American authors who engaged in forms of literary protest from approximately 1850 to 1950 including Henry David Thoreau, Harriet Jacobs, Stephen Crane, James Weldon Johnson, Kate Chopin, John Steinbeck, and Mine Okubo.
We will think of literature and protest as broadly as possible to make connections across time to consider the rich literary history that continues to inform our contemporary moment. The historical period covered in this class, from the dawn of the Civil War until World War II, established may political and cultural trends that continue to shape forms of protest in the 21st century. Accordingly, we will study the past with an eye to how it informs our present.
Through our study of major American authors, we will attempt to answer some of the following questions: How has literature been mobilized as a form of protest? What impact has dissent had on American literature? What cultural narratives shape our understanding of protest and dissent?

ENGL 130 Introduction to Fiction Writing (3)

Intended for sophomores and first-year students. A writing-intensive introductory workshop in fiction. Close study of a wide range of short stories; emphasis on technical problems. Composition, discussion, and revision of original student stories. Students may not receive credit for both ENGL 130 and ENGL 132H. This course (or ENGL 132H) serves as a prerequisite for other courses in the fiction sequence of the creative writing program.

ENGL 131 Introduction to Poetry Writing (3)

Intended for sophomores and first-year students. A writing-intensive introductory workshop in poetry. Close study of a wide range of published poetry and of poetic terms and techniques. Composition, discussion, and revision of original student poems. Students may not receive credit for both ENGL 131 and ENGL 133H. This course (or ENGL 133H) serves as a prerequisite for other courses in the poetry sequence of the creative writing concentration and minor.
Welcome to ENGL-131, a workshop/lecture centered class focused on poetry writing. Over the semester, you will have the opportunity to try a variety of exercises; to explore new styles and techniques; to receive detailed feedback on poems and essays, and to develop practices and habits that will help you in your writing life.
Our class will be run as a workshop/lecture, which means that your attendance, timely work, and active participation in class discussions are crucial to the community we will build here.
You will read and write a great deal in this class. We’ll begin each unit by reading works I hand out or provided in your required textbook. Then move into discussing works-in-progress by your peers.
By the end of this course, you will be able to identify and apply the critical components of poetry. You will also be able to outline and explain various styles, structures, and modes of contemporary writing, evaluate their usefulness, and apply this knowledge in both classroom critique and revision. You will be able to identify and explain the uses and effects of styles in poetic forms. Throughout the semester, you’ll develop your pieces using modern and contemporary works as models.

ENGL 140 Introduction to Gay and Lesbian Culture and Literature (WGST 140) (3)

Introduces students to concepts in queer theory and recent sexuality studies. Topics include queer lit, AIDS, race and sexuality, representations of gays and lesbians in the media, political activism/literature.

ENGL 143 Film and Culture (3)

Examines the ways culture shapes and is shaped by film. This course uses comparative methods to contrast films as historic or contemporary, mainstream or cutting-edge, in English or a foreign language, etc.

ENGL 144 Popular Genres (3)

Introductory course on popular literary genres. Students will read and discuss works in the area of mystery, romance, westerns, science fiction, children’s literature, and horror fiction.
In this course, students will critically analyze five popular genres dystopian literature, science fiction, detective fiction, fantasy, and one additional genre.
The media through which the class will study popular genres include novels, movies, television shows, blogs, and websites. Whereas up to this point most of us have enjoyed popular genres as entertainment without thinking critically about them, this class will be a departure. Students in this class will examine the assigned texts from an analytical perspective. We will look at formulaic analysis, historical context, cultural context, and ideological approaches, among others. What does popular literature tell us about the world in which we live? What kinds of influences are we making ourselves susceptible to when we read this literature?

ENGL 146 Science Fiction/Fantasy/Utopia (3)

Readings in and theories of science fiction, utopian and dystopian literatures, and fantasy fiction.
This course examines the birth and development of science fiction in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, especially as science fiction intersects with the tradition of utopian and dystopian speculation. Texts will include Edward Bellamy’s Looking Backward (1888), H.G. Wells’ The Time Machine (1895), E.M. Forster’s The Machine Stops, Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World (1932), Olaf Stapledon’s Starmaker (1937), and Ayn Rand’s Anthem (1938). Films will include 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968), Koyaanisqatsi (1982), Ex Machina (2015), and Don Hertzfeldt’s animated short The World of Tomorrow (2015), as well as episodes of Black Mirror.

ENGL 265 Literature and Race, Literature and Ethnicity (3)

MAYMESTER. Considers texts in a comparative ethnic/race studies framework and examines how these texts explore historical and contemporary connections between groups of people in the United States and the Americas.

ENGL 268 Medicine, Literature, and Culture (3)

MAYMESTER. An introduction to key topics that focus on questions of representation at the intersections of medicine, literature, and culture

ENGL 283 Life Writing: Black Music, Memoirs, Movement, Faith (3)

MAYMESTER. Students will analyze and compose different forms of life writing such as autobiography, biography, and autoethnography. Readings will include theories of autobiography and selected literature.
Black Music, Memoirs, Movement, Faith:
What are life narratives? How can reading about other’s lives and writing about our own life experiences help healing? This is especially relevant in the wake of our global health pandemic. In this course, we will read, listen to, and write through diverse genres, including memoirs, biography, music playlists, creative non-fiction, religious autobiography, poetry and visual art. Students will read excerpts from writing as craft models that enable them to better develop their writing voice and vision and they will write and workshop their own life narratives. Note this course focuses on African American and Black authors. Authors include: Elizabeth Alexander, The Light of the World, Hanif Abdurraqib, Go Ahead In the Rain, Notes to A Tribe Called Quest, Farah Jasmine Griffin, If You Can’t Be Free, Be A Mystery, In Search of Billie Holiday, June Jordan, Soldier, A Poet’s Childhood, and Monica Coleman, Bipolar Faith, A Black Woman’s Journey with Depression and Faith.

ENGL 235 Studies in Jane Austen (3)

Fulfills a major core requirement. This course focuses on both the novels of Jane Austen and their fate since publication in the early 19th century. They have inspired countless imitations, over 150 sequels and continuations, and more than 30 full-length films. We will trace the transmission and transformation of the original texts across time and cultures. Previously offered as ENGL 340.

ENEC 307 Energy and Material Flows in the Environment and Society (3)

Examines regional to global scale flow of materials and energy through materials extractions, processing, manufacturing, product use, recycling and disposal, including relevance to policy development. Reviews natural cycles, basic physics, and technology of energy production. Field trips to nearby energy projects will be organized and might require students to be occasionally available outside of regular class times.

EXSS 221 Introduction to Sport and Recreation Administration (3)

In this course, students are introduced to the policies and problems of organizing and administering sport, recreation and physical education programs in public and private settings. A grade of B or better is required for EXSS-SA students.

EXSS 224 Sport Sales and Revenue Production Seminar (3)

This course will analyze and produce skills essential to the revenue production and sales process commonly found in the sport business. In this class students will develop an understanding and appreciation for the sales and revenue-production process related to a sport franchise and/or organization.

EXSS 385 Biomechanics of Sport (3)

Prerequisites, EXSS 175, MATH 110. Instructor may approve equivalents for EXSS prerequisites. The study and analysis of human movement including fundamental aspects of the musculoskeletal and articular systems. Principles of biomechanics, including application to neuromuscular fitness activities, aerodynamics in sport, hydrodynamics, rotary motion, throw-like and push-like patterns, and analysis of projectiles.

HEBR 101 Elementary Modern Hebrew I (JWST 101)(3)

Introduces the essential elements of modern Hebrew structure and vocabulary and aspects of modern Israeli culture. Aural comprehension, reading, speaking, and writing are stressed. This intensive class will meet online via Zoom every day (MTWRF) from 9:45-12:00.

HIST 107 Medieval History (3)

A survey of Western Europe and the Mediterranean World, 300-1500.

HIST 110 Introduction to the Cultures and Histories of Native North America (AMST 110) (3)

An interdisciplinary introduction to Native American history and studies. The course uses history, literature, art, and cultural studies to study the Native American experience.

HIST 134 Modern East Asia (ASIA 134) (PWAD 134) (3)

Comparative and interdisciplinary introduction to China and Japan in the 19th and 20th centuries, focusing on impact of the West, nation building, industrialization, and evolution of mass society.

HIST 140 The World since 1945 (3)

This introduction to the contemporary world examines the Cold War and its international aftermath, decolonization, national development across a variety of cases, and trends in the global economy.

INLS 151 Retrieving and Analyzing Information (3)

Introduction to and application of the processes that can be used in seeking information, evaluating the quality of the information retrieved, and synthesizing the information into a useful form.

INLS 161 Tools for Information Literacy (3)

Tools and concepts for information literacy. Includes software use and maintenance, computer applications, and networked information systems.

INLS 201 Foundations of Information Science (3)

Examines the evolution of information science; information representation, organization and management; search and retrieval; human information seeking and interaction; organizational behavior and communication; policy, ethics and scholarly communications. Offered fall and spring.

INLS 382 Information Systems Analysis and Design (3)

Prerequisite or corequisite, INLS 161. Analysis of organizational problems and how information systems can be designed to solve those problems. Application of database and interface design principles to the implementation of information systems. Evening

INLS 385 Information Use for Organizational Effectiveness (3)

Basic concepts in the way that information, people, and technology interact to influence organizational effectiveness. Principles of problem solving, teamwork, leadership, and organizational change/innovation.

INLS 465 Understanding Information Technology for Managing Digital Collections (3)

MAYMESTER. Prepares students to be conversant with information technologies that underlie digital collections in order to evaluate the work of developers, delegate tasks, write requests for proposals, and establish policies and procedures. Teaches students how to think about information technology systems and recognize and manage interdependencies between parts of the systems.

INLS 490 Diversity, Equity and Inclusion and Open Access (3)

In this course, we will explore the current state of diversity, equity and inclusion (DEI) efforts in the Open Access movement, examine best practices for library services, and develop strategies to prepare for the future. Throughout the course we will learn about the human, technical, and structural challenges to Open Access, and also why DEI is an integral part of scholarly communications. This course aims to provide an intensive opportunity to become conversant in foundational topics related to DEI and Open Access, including effective communication, emotional labor management, and empathy. To facilitate students’ professional development, the majority of the course will be devoted to applied learning situations, creative projects, and discussions. By the end of the course, students will be able to define and explain core concepts related to DEI and Open Access. Students will critically engage with the Open Access movement, tackling issues such as underrepresented voices, accessibility, and labor. Last, but not least, this course aims to help students become more comfortable engaging with a topic that is dynamic, timely and rapidly evolving.

INLS 520 Organization of Information (3)

Introduction to the problems and methods of organizing information, including information structures, knowledge schemas, data structures, terminological control, index language functions, and implications for searching.

INLS 523 Introduction to Database Concepts and Applications (3)

Prerequisite, INLS 161 or permission of instructor. Design and implementation of basic database systems. Semantic modeling, relational database theory, including normalization, indexing, and query construction, SQL.

INLS 560 Programming for Information Professionals (3)

Introduction to programming and computational concepts. Students will learn to write programs using constructs such as iteration, flow control, variables, functions, and error handling. No programming experience required. Late afternoon.

INLS 582 Systems Analysis (3)

Prerequisite, INLS 382 or graduate standing. Introduction to the systems approach to the design and development of information systems. Methods and tools for the analysis and modeling of system functionality (e.g., structured analysis) and data represented in the system (e.g., object-oriented analysis) are studied.

INLS 685 Project Management: Strategy and Applications (3)

This course is a broad introduction to project management principles, tools, and strategies intended for use in a variety of applications. Key topics include project planning tools, project process groups, risk assessment, budgeting/cost estimation, and team management. Through the use of readings, videos, assignments, and forum discussions, students will have the opportunity to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the strategy behind successful project management and problem resolution.

INLS 690 Diversity, Equity and Inclusion in Open Access (3)

In this course, we will explore the current state of diversity, equity and inclusion (DEI) efforts in the Open Access movement, examine best practices for library services, and develop strategies to prepare for the future. Throughout the course we will learn about the human, technical, and structural challenges to Open Access, and also why DEI is an integral part of scholarly communications. This course aims to provide an intensive opportunity to become conversant in foundational topics related to DEI and Open Access, including effective communication, emotional labor management, and empathy. To facilitate students’ professional development, the majority of the course will be devoted to applied learning situations, creative projects, and discussions. By the end of the course, students will be able to define and explain core concepts related to DEI and Open Access. Students will critically engage with the Open Access movement, tackling issues such as underrepresented voices, accessibility, and labor. Last, but not least, this course aims to help students become more comfortable engaging with a topic that is dynamic, timely and rapidly evolving.

INLS 750 Introduction Digital Curation (3)

Introduces students to digital curation; focusing best practices for the creation, selection, storage, provision, and long-term preservation of digital entities. Discusses the digital/data curation lifecycles and identifies the activities associated with each stage and their social, legal, ethical, and policy implications. Offered fall, spring, summer.

INLS 752 Digital Preservation and Access (3)

MAYMESTER. Focuses on best practices for the creation, provision, and long-term preservation of digital entities. Topics include digitization technologies, standards and quality control, digital asset management, grant writing and metadata.

KOR 101 Elementary Korean I (4)

Introduction to the basics of modern Korean, including the pronunciation of spoken Korean, the writing system of Hangul, communication and reading skills in controlled contexts, and fundamentals of grammar. This intensive class will meet online via Zoom every day (MTWRF) from 9:45-12:45.

MEJO 141 Media Ethics (3)

Explore what constitutes ethical practices, what interferes with ethical practices, and what emerging ethical issues may challenge the newest generation of professional communicators. Cases involve print, broadcast, and Internet news media; photojournalism; graphic design; public relations; and advertising.

MEJO 153 Writing and Reporting (3)

A laboratory course that teaches journalistic skills essential to writing across platforms. Practice in using news gathering tools, such as sourcing and interviewing techniques; writing stories, including leads, organization, quotations, and data; editing for grammar, punctuation, brevity, style, and accuracy; and critical thinking about news values and audiences.

MEJO 340 Introduction to Media Law: Journalism Focus (3)

Prerequisite, MEJO 153. Focuses on speech and press freedoms under the First Amendment. Topics include prior restraint, libel, privacy, protection of anonymous sources, free press-fair trial, federal regulation of electronic and new media, freedom of information, intellectual property, and international issues.

MEJO 376 Sports Marketing and Advertising (3)

MAYMESTER. Examines the range of promotional techniques being used in the modern sports industry. Topics include sponsorships, advertising, merchandising, and the effects of commercialization.

MEJO 379 Advertising/PR Research (3)

Critical understanding and application of quantitative and qualitative methods used in the strategic planning and evaluation of advertising and public relations campaigns.

MEJO 390 Visual Communication Entrepreneurship (3)

Students gain an understanding of media and journalism entrepreneurship. The course will utilize online learning tools to give students the skills and concepts necessary to manage a creative communication production business. Open to all majors. JRN Level 2, Conceptual or APR Choice.

MEJO 441 Diversity and Communication (3)

An examination of racial stereotypes and minority portrayals in United States culture and communication. Emphasis is on the portrayal of Native Americans, African Americans, Hispanics, and Asian Americans in the mass media.

MEJO 442 Gender, Class, Race and Mass Media (WGST 442) (3)

The media play a critical role in the construction and contestation of ideas about gender, class, and race. Using a range of methods, students will analyze media messages past and present to understand how gender, race, and class influence media production and consumption.

MEJO 475 Concepts of Marketing (3)

MAYMESTER. Designed to provide the larger business context for students anticipating careers in advertising, public relations, and other media industries, the course teaches the vocabulary and basic concepts of marketing as it will be practiced.

MEJO 717 Visual Communication and Information Architecture (3)

This course explores the overlap between several related disciplines: information visualization and architecture, cognitive science, graphic design and journalism. Content covered includes cognitive psychology, information design, visualization, and ethics. In this course, students will learn the basic rules of graphic design and information visualization through readings, discussions on real-world examples and the design of several projects. The goal is not that students become a designer, but that they learn to visually organize information to communicate. MATC students only.

MEJO 900 Reading and Research (3)

Permission of the instructor. Advanced reading or research in a selected field. May be repeated for credit.

MEJO 993 Master’s Research and Thesis (3)

NSCI 225 Sensation and Perception (3)

Prerequisite, PSYC 101 or NSCI 175. Topics in vision, audition, and the lower senses. Receptor mechanisms, psychophysical methods, and selected perceptual phenomena will be discussed.

PHIL 101 Introduction to Philosophy: Central Problems, Great Minds, Big Ideas (3)

MAYMESTER. An introduction to philosophy focusing on a few central problems, for example: free will, the basis of morality, the nature and limits of knowledge, and the existence of God.

PHIL 110 Philosophical Texts that Changed the World: An Introduction to Philosophy through Great Works (3)

An introduction to philosophy focusing on several great books from the history of Western philosophy. See course description at the department’s website for which books will be covered each semester.

PHIL 143 AI and the Future of Humanity: Philosophical Issues about Technology and Human Survival (3)

This course investigates philosophical issues arising from advanced forms of technology, in particular artificial intelligence, virtual reality, and biological augmentation. We will consider questions about the dangers and benefits of AI, survival in non-biological ways, moral constraints on AI, the relationship between human and machine morality, and others.

PHIL 165 Bioethics (3)

An examination of ethical issues in the life sciences and technologies, medicine, public health, and/or human interaction with nonhuman animals or the living environment.

PHIL 170 Liberty, Rights, and Responsibilities: Introduction to Social Ethics and Political Thought (3)

An examination of major issues in political philosophy, e.g., liberty, individual rights, social responsibility, legal authority, civil authority, civil disobedience. Readings include classical and contemporary writings.

PHIL 185 Aesthetics and the Philosophy of Art (3)

The nature of art and artworks and their aesthetic appraisal.

PHIL 272 The Ethics of Peace, War, and Defense (POLI 272) (PWAD 272) (3)

An analysis of ethical issues that arise in peace, war, and defense, e.g., the legitimacy of states, just war theory, terrorism, weapons of mass destruction.

PHIL 274 Race, Racism, and Social Justice: African-American Political Philosophy (3)

Race, identity, discrimination, multiculturalism, affirmative action, and slave reparations in the writings of Walker, Delany, Douglass, Cooper, DuBois, King, and Malcolm X.

PORT 316 Brazilian Performance in Music and Dance: Capoeira (3)

Study of Brazilian capoeira from its roots to the present day. Focus on verbal and nonverbal discourse experienced through the rules, songs, movements, rhythms, rituals of capoeira. In English; credit for major/minor in Portuguese if readings and written work are done in Portuguese.

PSYC 230 Cognitive Psychology (3)

Prerequisite, PSYC 101. Topics in attention, memory, visual, auditory, and other forms of information processing, decision making, and thinking.

PSYC 245 Abnormal Psychology (3)

MAYMESTER. Prerequisite, PSYC 101. Major forms of behavior disorders in children and adults, with an emphasis on description, causation, and treatment.

PSYC 260 Social Psychology (3)

Prerequisite, PSYC 101. Introductory survey of experimental social psychology covering attitudes, interpersonal processes, and small groups.

RELI 103 (JWST 103) Introduction to the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament Literature (3)

This course introduces students to the various books of the Hebrew Bible and to the history and culture of ancient Israel, focusing on the formation of national identity, ancient conceptualizations of divinity, ritual practice, and modes of social regulation, all of which are set against the background of the ancient Near East. Honors version available.

RELI 122 Introduction to Philosophical Approaches to Religion (3)

An introduction to philosophical approaches to the study of religion, exploring such topics as religious language and experience, the problem of evil, the relation between religious belief and practice, and issues of religious diversity. Honors version available.

RELI 162 Catholicism Today: An Introduction to the Contemporary Catholic Church (3)

This course provides students with a first glimpse and insight into the Catholic tradition, past, present, and future: its beliefs, structure, aims, successes, and failures.

RELI 180 Introduction to Islamic Civilization (ASIA 180) (3)

A broad, comprehensive, and interdisciplinary introduction to the traditional civilization of the Muslim world. Students may not receive credit for both RELI 180/ASIA 180 and ASIA 138/HIST 138.

RELI 201 Ancient Biblical Interpretation (3)

The course looks at the origins of biblical interpretation, how the Hebrew Bible was interpreted around the turn of the Common Era, the key formative period for early Christianity and rabbinic Judaism. We consider the nature of interpretation as an endeavor, as well as how the Bible came to be viewed as Scripture.

RELI 236 Religious Things (3)

An introduction to religion and visual culture in the United States. The course focuses on painting, ritual objects, and architecture.

RUSS 101 Basic Russian Communication I (4)

Essential basics of Russian for everyday conversations. Lays foundation for development of four language skills (speaking, writing, listening, and reading) indispensable for communication on everyday topics in a variety of contexts. Fosters interaction through acquisition of essential communicative and conversational strategies. Introduces learners to structure of contemporary standard Russian through culturally relevant materials. One afternoon meeting per week. REMOTE ONLY-SYNCHRONOUS.

RUSS 203 Intermediate Russian Communication I (3)

Transitional skills for fluent speaking, writing, listening, and reading for intermediate learners. Furthers learners’ competency for communication on everyday topics. Prepares learners for communication on subjects beyond their immediate needs. Expands interactive skillset necessary to maintain conversations and present individual opinions using complex structures. Employs adapted and non-adapted learning materials to promote mastery of contemporary standard Russian. REMOTE ONLY-SYNCHRONOUS.

SPAN 105 Spanish for High Beginners (4)

Accelerated course that covers SPAN 101 and 102 for students with previous study of Spanish. Aural comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Students may not receive credit for both SPAN 105 and SPAN 102, 111, 401, or 404. Seven-week course of study.

SPAN 261 Advanced Spanish in Context (3)

Prerequisite, SPAN 204. Fifth semester Spanish course required for all majors and minors that uses literature, film, and culture as a basis for reviewing grammatical concepts, developing writing competency, and improving overall communication skills. Students may not receive credit for both SPAN 261 and SPAN 267.

SPAN 301 Introduction to Literary and Cultural Analysis (3)

Prerequisite, SPAN 261. Prepares students to formulate and communicate critical analyses of literary works in at least three genres chosen from theater, poetry, essay, narrative, and film while situating the readings within a cultural context. Students will improve Spanish language proficiency and appreciation of different world views through literature and culture. Previously offered as SPAN 260. Students may not receive credit for both SPAN 301 and SPAN 260 or 302.

SPAN 329 Spanish for Professional and Community Engagement (3)

Prerequisite, SPAN 324, 325, or 328. Eighth-semester capstone course applying skills in Spanish language and cultures to professional and community contexts. Assignments include professional documents, community service work and projects, and a research project. Open only to students in the minor in Spanish for the professions. For an additional credit, you can also enroll in ROML 194 and complete 30 service-learning hours with the community partner of your choice either near campus in Chapel Hill or in your home town (or wherever you’ll be while taking the course.) You may complete your service hours over both summer sessions.

SPAN 361 Hispanic Film. (3)

MAYMESTER. Prerequisite, SPAN 261 or SPAN 267. Study of contemporary cultural, historical, and aesthetic issues through narrative film, documentary, and other media from Latin America and Spain.

WGST 101 Introduction to Women Studies (3)

An interdisciplinary introduction to the field of Women’s and Gender Studies, this class explores feminist perspectives on intersecting inequalities based on gender, race, class, and sexuality. Topics include: work and labor; sexuality and sexual identity; gender relations; images of women and gender in literature, science and technology; religion; art; family; and the history of feminist struggles. Course readings are drawn from the humanities and the social sciences.

Second Session, 2021

AMST 110 Introduction to the Cultures and Histories of Native North America (HIST 110) (3)

An interdisciplinary introduction to Native American history and studies. The course uses history, literature, art, and cultural studies to study the Native American experience.

ARAB 204 Intermediate Arabic II (4)

Prerequisite, ARAB 203. Fourth semester of Arabic language instruction, comprising both Modern Standard Arabic and one spoken dialect. Coursework includes expanded grammar and vocabulary, and culturally relevant activities. This intensive class will meet online via Zoom every day (MTWRF) from 9:45-12:45.

ASIA 228 Contested Souls: Literature, the Arts, and Religious Identity in Modern India (3)

An analysis of how historical interactions between Hinduism and Islam have inspired the creation of philosophies and great works of literature and art that continue to inform Indian society today. This hybrid course will meet online via Zoom on Mondays 3:15-5:50; the rest of the instruction will be asynchronous.

CHIN 102 Elementary Chinese II (4)

Prerequisite, CHIN 101. Continued training in listening, speaking, reading, and writing on everyday topics. Writing Chinese characters is required. Students may not receive credit for both CHIN 101 or CHIN 102 and CHIN 111. This intensive hybrid course will meet online via Zoom every day (MTWRF) from 1:15-3:15, and will have an hour’s worth of additional asynchronous learning activities every day.

CHIN 204 Intermediate Chinese II (4)

Prerequisite, CHIN 203. Second-year level of modern standard Chinese. Writing Chinese characters is required. Students may not receive credit for both CHIN 204 and CHIN 212. This intensive hybrid course will meet online via Zoom every day (MTWRF) from 1:15-3:15, and will have an hour’s worth of additional asynchronous learning activities every day.

CLAR 245 Archaeology of Italy (3)

A study of women’s roles and influence in the Late Antique and Byzantine world, through analysis of contemporary Byzantine texts by and about women, historical testimonies, and works of art.

CLAS 126 Medical Word Formation and Etymology (3)

Systematic study of the formation of medical terms from Greek and Latin roots, to build vocabulary and recognition.

CLAS 263 Athletics in the Greek and Roman World (3)

Study of athletics as a unifying force in ancient society, emphasizing the Olympic Games and other religious festivals. Consideration of athletic professionalism, propaganda, and social trends using literary and archaeological sources.

COMM 113 Public Speaking (3)

Theory and extensive practice in various types of speaking.

COMM 120 Introduction to Interpersonal and Organizational Communication (MNGT 120) (3)

An introduction to communication theory, research, and practice in a variety of interpersonal and organizational contexts. This course examines the role of communication in both personal and professional relationships.

COMM 140 Introduction to Media History, Theory, and Criticism (3)

An introduction to the critical analysis of film, television, advertising, video, and new media texts, contexts, and audiences.

COMM 160 Introduction to Performance Studies (3)

As the introductory course in performance studies, students will explore and experiment with performance as ritual, performance in everyday life, and the performance of literature.

COMM 170 Rhetoric and Public Issues (3)

Examines the basic nature and importance of rhetoric and argumentation. Attention is devoted to interpreting the persuasive function of texts and their relation to modern forms of life.

COMM 171 Argumentation and Debate (3)

Analysis of issues, use of evidence, reasoning, brief making, and refutation. Argumentative speeches and debates on legal cases and on current issues. Designed for prospective law students public policy students, speech teachers, and college debaters.

COMM 224 Introduction to Gender and Communication (WGST 224) (3)

Examines multiple relationships among gender, communication, and culture. Explores how communication creates gender and shapes relationships and how communication reflects, sustains, and alters cultural views of gender.

COMM 450 Media and Popular Culture (3)

Prerequisite, COMM 140. Permission of the instructor for non-majors. Examination of communication processes and cultural significance of film, television, and other electronic media.

DRAM 287 African American Theatre (3)

This course investigates the history and legacy of African American drama through the study of its literary texts, performance styles, and cultural history.

DRAM 292 “Corner of the Sky”: The American Musical (3)

This course considers the anatomy and diversity of the American musical, exploring its history and aesthetics, and employing an interdisciplinary approach to examining its shows, sounds, stars, structures, styles, and sensibilities within the genre’s dominant contexts of Broadway, Hollywood, and Utopia.

EDUC 375 Identity and Sexuality (3)

This course will guide students in the examination of the vital role that sexuality, sexual identity, gender, race and class play in families, communities, and educational settings. These and other socio-cultural factors, which often intersect and are embedded in historic ways of constructing what it means to be “normal,” fundamentally shape how individuals understand themselves, their place in the world, as well as others around them.

EDUC 526 Ethics and Education: From Global Problems to Classroom Dilemmas (3)

Among the topics examined are ethical implications of democratic schooling for a democratic society, educators as moral agents, and education as an institution with incumbent responsibilities. Students explore the explicit and implied ethics of education and schooling as they relate to policy makers, educators, and citizens concerned about social justice.

EDUC 532 Human Development and Learning (3)

This course examines the field of human development as it contributes to the teaching and learning of all children and youth. The emphasis is on understanding the nature of development in family and educational contexts and the implications of research and theory on human development for teacher practice and human services and the creation of supportive learning environments for all children and youth.

EDUC 689 Foundations of Special Education (3)

This course will provide an advanced introduction to key concepts, issues, and service delivery approaches pertaining to the educational needs of students with high incidence disabilities.

ENGL 100 Basic Writing (3)

Required for incoming students with SAT Evidence-Based Reading and Writing or ACT scores below a threshold set by the department. Please visit the department Web site for the most updated scores. The courses focuses on academic writing in a variety of contexts. Workshop format involves frequent writing and revision.

ENGL 105 English Composition and Rhetoric (3)

This college-level course focuses on written and oral argumentation, composition, research, information literacy, and rhetorical analysis. The course introduces students to the specific disciplinary contexts for written work and oral presentations required in college courses. Students may not receive credit for both ENGL 102 and ENGL 102I, 105, or 105I. Course utilizes computers.

ENGL 123 Introduction to Fiction (3)

Novels and shorter fiction by Defoe, Austen, Dickens, Faulkner, Wolfe, Fitzgerald, Joyce, and others.
Fiction after the Apocalypse: We will be reading and discussing works of fiction that explore life during and after irrevocable transformative events, including pandemics. Apocalypse will here be considered in its original Greek meaning: to uncover, or disclose. Despite present-day connotations, the apocalypse is not the end, but rather a transition, a peeling back to reveal what was hidden. We will examine how writers depict apocalypse on the macrocosmic level (large, socio-historical metamorphoses) and on the microcosmic level (personal revelations and life-changing experiences). And in turn, we will keep in mind that it is the special power of literature to initiate an apocalypse in us as readers.

ENGL 140 Introduction to Gay and Lesbian Culture and Literature (WGST 140.01W) (3)

Introduces students to concepts in queer theory and recent sexuality studies. Topics include queer lit, AIDS, race and sexuality, representations of gays and lesbians in the media, political activism/literature. Same as WGST 140.

ENGL 141 World Literatures in English (3)

This course will be a basic introduction to literatures in English from Africa, the Caribbean, South Asia, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and other Anglophone literary traditions.

ENGL 143 Film and Culture (3)

Examines the ways culture shapes and is shaped by film. This course uses comparative methods to contrast films as historic or contemporary, mainstream or cutting-edge, in English or a foreign language, etc.

ENGL 146 Science Fiction/Fantasy/Utopia (3)

Readings in and theories of science fiction, utopian and dystopian literatures, and fantasy fiction.

ENGL 147 Mystery Fiction (3)

Studies in classic and contemporary mystery and detective fiction.
Crime, Sex, & the Social Underbelly: In mystery fiction, we’re going to examine the genre from the point of view of the writer and critic. We’re going to look at how mysteries and crime fiction are written (setting, plotting, voice, point-of-view, characterization, etc…), while analyzing their social relevance and larger thematic concerns (crime, paranoia, sexuality, gender, race, class). We’re going to treat mystery fiction like we would any kind of literature in an English class, but we’re also going to examine how it works as a “genre” and its connection to film (For example: There have been over 20 film and TV versions of Arthur Conan Doyle’s Hound of the Baskervilles.) By the end of the class, you should have a strong background on how mysteries function, what sort of literary tropes re-occur, and why it persists as such a popular genre.

ENGL 148 Horror (3)

This course examines the complexities and pleasures of horror, from its origins in Gothic and pre-Gothic literatures and arts. Topics include psychology, aesthetics, politics, allegory, ideology, and ethics.
“Terror and Horror are so far opposite that the first expands the soul, and awakens the faculties to a high degree of life; the other contracts, freezes and nearly annihilates them.” – Ann Radcliffe, “On the Supernatural in Poetry”
This course will explore how the visceral interplay between terror and horror lies at the heart of a genre that confronts its readers with the darker side of human nature. We will explore horror fiction from its origins in the Gothic novel to the contemporary work of Stephen King alongside film examples that range from Alfred Hitchcock’s Rebecca to Stanley Kubrick’s The Shining. Readings will include Frankenstein, Dracula, The Haunting of Hill House and shorter works by Edgar Allan Poe, H.P. Lovecraft and Richard Matheson. To enrich our discussion of the literature, we will also watch classic horror films such as Psycho, Alien and The Exorcist.

ENGL 149 Digital and Multimedia Composition (3)

In this class students will practice composing in contemporary digital writing spaces. Students will study theories of electronic networks and mediation, and their connections to literacy, creativity, and collaboration. Students will also develop their own multimedia projects using images, audio, video, and words. Topics include the rhetoric of the Internet, online communities, and digital composition.

ENGL 155 The Visual and Graphic Narrative (3)

This course examines various visual texts, including graphic novels and emerging narrative forms, and explores how meaning is conveyed through composition, the juxtaposition and framing of images, and the relationship between words and images. Students create their own visual narratives.

ENGL 158 Postcolonial Literature (3)

This course is a multigenre introduction to postcolonial literatures. Topics will include postcolonial Englishes, nationalism, anti-imperialism, postcolonial education, and the intersections between national and gender identities in literature. Previously offered as ENGL 463.

ENGL 164 Introduction to Latina/o Studies (3)

Introduction to major questions of Latina/o Studies through an examination of literature, culture, the visual arts, and music. Topics include imperialism, colonialism, labor, decolonization, nationalism, ethnicity and other aspects of identity and identification, and new rubrics. Previously offered as ENGL 364.

ENGL 269 Introduction to Disability Studies (3)

This course will introduce students to the key critical concepts, debates, and questions of practice in the emerging scholarly field of disability studies.

ENGL 278 Irish Writing, 1800-2000 (3)

This course introduces major texts and current themes, from Joyce to the postcolonial, in Irish writing from 1800 to 2000.

ENGL 284 Reading Children’s Literature (3)

An overview of the tradition of children’s literature, considering the ways those books point to our basic assumptions about meaning, culture, self, society, gender, economics.
Spend this summer in some exciting places. Plunge down the rabbit hole with Alice, get whirled to Oz with Dorothy or fly to Neverland with Peter and Wendy, go shopping on Diagon Alley with Harry and Hagrid. In English 284 “Reading Children’s Fiction,” read (or reread) some of the most influential and lasting books written in English. Enjoy works hailed as classics alongside works recovered for their importance and vitality—get lost one week in Little Women and the next in the pictures and stories of the children’s magazine, The Brownies Book, edited by W. E. B. Du Bois and a masterwork of the 1920s.
This class asks: why did these works matter when they were written? What do they tell us about their times? What definitions and values of youth do they offer? Why have they persisted? We’ll consider what Peter Pan and Winnie the Pooh tells us about the race to the South Pole, what the Lost Boys suggest about the Great War, what Harry Potter offers regarding the information age.
In addition to the reading and asynchronous discussion work, you will complete a project—in two five-page stages in which you can build on feedback—based on a book for children or youth drawn from the digitized pre-1923 titles of our own University’s Juvenile Historical Collection. These were the books that young people in Chapel Hill came to the library to borrow, the works that they actually read at the time. Together you and I will choose one of them that matters to you and you will become the expert on it, researching where it came from (who was its author? its illustrator? its specific audience?) and what it means. For your final, you will share the excitement and significance of that work.

ENEC 309 Environmental Values and Valuation (3)

Introduction to the methods for assigning value to aspects of the environment and to interhuman and human-environment interactions. The approach is interdisciplinary, drawing on methods from philosophy, ecology, psychology, aesthetics, economics, religion, etc. Computer equipped with internet access required.

EXSS 322 Fundamentals of Sport Marketing (3)

Prerequisite, EXSS 221. A grade of B or better in EXSS 221 is required. This course is designed to introduce students to marketing within the sports industry, including the unique aspects of the sport product and sport consumer markets.

HEBR 102 Elementary Modern Hebrew II (JWST 102)(3)

Prerequisite, HEBR 101. Continued instruction in the essential elements of modern Hebrew structure and vocabulary and aspects of modern Israeli culture. Aural comprehension, reading, speaking, and writing are stressed. This intensive class will meet online via Zoom every day (MTWRF) from 9:45-12:00.

INLS 385 Information Use for Organizational Effectiveness (3)

Basic concepts in the way that information, people, and technology interact to influence organizational effectiveness. Principles of problem solving, teamwork, leadership, and organizational change/innovation.

INLS 500 Human Information Interactions (3)

Prerequisite, INLS 203 or graduate standing. The behavioral and cognitive activities of those who interact with information, with emphasis on the role of information mediators. How information needs are recognized and resolved; use and dissemination of information.

INLS 513 Resource Selection and Evaluation (3)
Identification, provision, and evaluation of resources to meet primary needs of clientele in different institutional environments.

INLS 581 Research Methods Overview (3)
An introduction to research methods used in information and library science, exploring the design, interpretation, analysis and application of published research.

INLS 767 Information Assurance (3)

Information assurance is a broader concept than (computerized) information security. It deals with aspects of data integrity, privacy, paper and human security issues, and security from several perspectives; legal issues, technical tools and methods, social and ethical concerns, and organization’s policies.

JAPN 162 Japanese Popular Culture (4)

This course will examine how and why Tokyo emerged as a dominant locale in global mass culture. Students will be introduced to major figures and genres in Japanese pop culture. This class will meet online via Zoom during its scheduled time (MTR 6:00-8:35 pm), but will also offer alternatives for asynchronous learning to students unable to participate at the scheduled time.

KOR 102 Elementary Korean II (4)

Prerequisite, KOR 101. Develops speaking and listening skills for everyday communication, reading skills for simple narratives and descriptive texts, and understanding for core grammatical patterns. This intensive class will meet online via Zoom every day (MTWRF) from 9:45-12:45.

MEJO 141 Media Ethics (3)

Explore what constitutes ethical practices, what interferes with ethical practices, and what emerging ethical issues may challenge the newest generation of professional communicators. Cases involve print, broadcast, and Internet news media; photojournalism; graphic design; public relations; and advertising.

MEJO 153 Writing and Reporting (3)

A laboratory course that teaches journalistic skills essential to writing across platforms. Practice in using news gathering tools, such as sourcing and interviewing techniques; writing stories, including leads, organization, quotations, and data; editing for grammar, punctuation, brevity, style, and accuracy; and critical thinking about news values and audiences.

MEJO 187 Foundations of Interactive Multimedia (3)

Entry-level course in multimedia storytelling that includes modules on theory; the profession; design; content gathering; and editing, programming, publishing, and usability.

MEJO 340 Introduction to Media Law: All Specializations (3)

Prerequisite, MEJO 153. Focuses on speech and press freedoms under the First Amendment. Topics include prior restraint, libel, privacy, protection of anonymous sources, free press-fair trial, federal regulation of electronic and new media, freedom of information, intellectual property, and international issues.

MEJO 393 Mass Communication Practicum (1)

Prerequisite, MEJO 153. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. Students work with area media and advertising and public relations firms and meet weekly for consultation and evaluation by the faculty advisor. Must be taken Pass/D+/D/Fail only.

MEJO 455 Sports Reporting (3)

Researching and writing sports stories, including game coverage, magazine features, and opinion columns. Students complete reporting and writing exercises inside and outside of the classroom. Short session June 21-July 2, 2021.

NSCI 222 Learning (3)

Prerequisite PSYC 101 or NSCI 175. Topics in Pavlovian and operant (instrumental) conditioning, learning theory, higher order cognitive learning, and application of those principles to mental-health related situations. Previously offered as PSYC 222.

PHIL 101 Introduction to Philosophy: Central Problems, Great Minds, Big Ideas (3)

An introduction to philosophy focusing on a few central problems, for example: free will, the basis of morality, the nature and limits of knowledge, and the existence of God.

PHIL 155 Truth and Proof: Introduction to Mathematical Logic (3)

Introduces the theory of deductive reasoning, using a symbolic language to represent and evaluate patterns of reasoning. Covers sentential logic and first-order predicate logic.

PHIL 160 Virtue, Value, and Happiness: An Introduction to Moral Theory (3)

Exploration of different philosophical perspectives about right and wrong, personal character, justice, moral reasoning, and moral conflicts. Readings drawn from classic or contemporary sources. Critical discussion emphasized.

PHIL 220 17th and 18th Century Western Philosophy (3)

A study of some major philosophical works from this period, including works by authors such as Descartes, Spinoza, Locke, Berkeley, Leibniz, Hume, and/or Kant.

PHIL 224 Existential Philosophy and the Meaning(lessness) of Life (3)

A survey of European philosophers in the phenomenological and existentialist traditions. Philosophers studied may include Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Husserl, Heidegger, Sartre, Camus.

PHIL 230 Mind, Matter, and Metaphysics: the Philosophy of Experience and Reality (3)

Topics in metaphysics and/or epistemology, such as: Is your mind different from your brain? Is it possible for us to know anything about the external world? Do we have free will? What distinguishes reasonable from unreasonable belief?

PHIL 266 Not All Fun and Games: Ethics of Sports (3)

An analysis of the moral significance of sports, the nature of sport and competition, and issues such as racism, gender equity, violence, and performance-enhancing drugs.

PHIL 272 The Ethics of Peace, War, and Defense (POLI 272) (PWAD 272) (3)

An analysis of ethical issues that arise in peace, war, and defense, e.g., the legitimacy of states, just war theory, terrorism, weapons of mass destruction.

PHIL 275 Moral and Philosophical Issues of Gender in Society (WGST 275) (3)

A survey of feminist perspectives on topics such as the meaning of oppression, sexism and racism, sex roles and stereotypes, ideals of female beauty, women in the workplace, pornography, rape.

POLI 100 American Democracy in Changing Times (3)

Why do Americans love democracy, but hate politics? Why are there only two political parties? Why do votes hate, yet respond to negative campaigning? This course will introduce students to politics in the United States, addressing these and many more questions about how American democracy works.

RELI 141 African American Religions (3)

Survey of the historical development of various African American religious traditions, with emphasis on folk spirituality, gender issues, black nationalism, and the role of the church in the black community. Honors version available.

RELI 207 Jesus in the Early Christian Gospels (3)

An analysis of the variety of traditions used in the first two centuries to portray Jesus, focusing on the reasons for this variety and the historical and literary problems it presents.

RELI 283 (ASIA 300) The Buddhist Tradition: India, Nepal, and Tibet (3)

Examines the diverse beliefs, practices, and cultures associated with Buddhism in the Himalayan regions of India, Nepal, and Tibet. Topics include Buddhism’s development and spread, the cultural dynamics of Himalayan societies, monasticism, folk religion, revivalism, tourism, gender, globalization, and the role of the state in shaping Buddhist life and culture.

RUSS 102 Basic Russian Communication II (4)

Further basics of Russian for everyday conversations. Continues to lay the foundation for development of four language skills (speaking, writing, listening, and reading) indispensable for communication on everyday topics in a variety of situational contexts. Fosters further interaction through acquisition of essential communicative and conversational strategies active in contemporary standard Russian through culturally relevant materials. One afternoon meeting per week. REMOTE ONLY-SYNCHRONOUS.

RUSS 204 Intermediate Russian Communication II (3)

Skills for fluent speaking, writing, listening, and reading for intermediate-to-advanced learners. Develops and deepens learners’ mastery of contemporary standard Russian. Stresses communication, individual expression, and fosters cultural sensitivity through systematic expansion of learners’ ability to conduct conversations in contemporary standard Russian on a widening variety of culturally relevant subjects. REMOTE ONLY-SYNCHRONOUS.

SPAN 261 Advanced Spanish in Context (3)

Prerequisite, SPAN 204. Fifth semester Spanish course required for all majors and minors that uses literature, film, and culture as a basis for reviewing grammatical concepts, developing writing competency, and improving overall communication skills. Students may not receive credit for both SPAN 261 and SPAN 267, 300, or 326.

SPAN 344 Latin American Cultural Topics: Performance, Power, and Politics: 20th/21st Century Latin American Theatre (3)

Prerequisite, SPAN 261 or 267. This course studies trends in thought, art, film, music, social practices, in the Spanish speaking Americas, including the United States. Topics may include colonialism, race, class, ethnicity, modernization, ecology, religion, gender, and popular culture.

This course begins by laying the foundation of the key elements of performance, power, and politics. It then explores how contemporary Latin American theatre reflects and impacts these intertwining phenomena with units on borders, institutions, oppression, and identity. Beyond reading and writing, students will view performances and interviews with theatricians.

WGST 101 Introduction to Women Studies (3)

An interdisciplinary introduction to the field of Women’s and Gender Studies, this class explores feminist perspectives on intersecting inequalities based on gender, race, class, and sexuality. Topics include: work and labor; sexuality and sexual identity; gender relations; images of women and gender in literature, science and technology; religion; art; family; and the history of feminist struggles. Course readings are drawn from the humanities and the social sciences.