Skip to main content
IMPORTANT: Check your courses' instruction modes on UNC-Chapel Hill Course Search Engine or Connect Carolina before enrolling

English and Comparative Literature

204 Greenlaw Hall, CB# 3520
(919) 962-5481

First Session, 2022

ENGL 105 English Composition and Rhetoric (3)

This college-level course focuses on written and oral argumentation, composition, research, information literacy, and rhetorical analysis. The course introduces students to the specific disciplinary contexts for written work and oral presentations required in college courses. Students may not receive credit for both ENGL 102 and ENGL 102I, 105, or 105I.

ENGL 123 Introduction to Fiction (3)

Novels and shorter fiction by Defoe, Austen, Dickens, Faulkner, Wolfe, Fitzgerald, Joyce, and others. Honors version available. Meets an hour and a half, four days a week in the morning.

ENGL 128 Major American Authors (3)

MAYMESTER. A study of approximately six major American authors drawn from Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne, Melville, Stowe, Whitman, Clemens, Dickinson, Chesnutt, James, Eliot, Stein, Hemingway, O’Neill, Faulkner, Hurston, or others. Meets mostly Asynchronously and for 50 minutes, three days a week in the afternoon.

ENGL 140 Introduction to Gay and Lesbian Culture and Literature (WGST 140) (3)

Introduces students to concepts in queer theory and recent sexuality studies. Topics include queer lit, AIDS, race and sexuality, representations of gays and lesbians in the media, political activism/literature.

ENGL 143 Film and Culture (3)

Examines the ways culture shapes and is shaped by film. This course uses comparative methods to contrast films as historic or contemporary, mainstream or cutting-edge, in English or a foreign language, etc.

ENGL 144 Popular Genres (3)

Introductory course on popular literary genres. Students will read and discuss works in the area of mystery, romance, westerns, science fiction, children’s literature, and horror fiction.

ENGL 146 Science Fiction/Fantasy/Utopia (3)

Readings in and theories of science fiction, utopian and dystopian literature, and fantasy fiction.

ENGL 149. Digital Composition (3)

In this class students will practice composing in contemporary digital writing spaces. Students will study theories of electronic networks and mediation, and their connections to literacy, creativity, and collaboration. Students will also develop their own multimedia projects using images, audio, video, and words. Topics include the rhetoric of the Internet, online communities, and digital composition.

ENGL 164 Introduction to Latina/o Studies (3)

Introduction to major questions of Latina/o Studies through an examination of literature, culture, the visual arts, and music. Topics include imperialism, colonialism, labor, decolonization, nationalism, ethnicity and other aspects of identity and identification, and new rubrics.

ENGL 235 Studies in Jane Austin (3)

Fulfills a major core requirement. This course focuses on both the novels of Jane Austen and their fate since publication in the early 19th century. They have inspired countless imitations, over 150 sequels and continuations, and more than 30 full-length films. We will trace the transmission and transformation of the original texts across time and cultures. Previously offered as
ENGL 340. Meets for two hours, three days a week in the afternoon. An additional course fee is required for this class. Fee will be discussed in class.

ENGL 265 Literature and Race, Literature and Ethnicity (3)

MAYMESTER. Considers texts in a comparative ethnic/race studies framework and examines how these texts explore historical and contemporary connections between groups of people in the United States and the Americas. Meets mostly asynchronously and for two hours, three days a week in the afternoon.

ENGL 268 Medicine, Literature, and Culture (3)

MAYMESTER. An introduction to key topics that focus on questions of representation at the intersections of medicine, literature, and culture. Meets for two hours, four days a week in the afternoons into the evenings.

ENGL 278 Irish Writing, 1800-2000 (3)

This course introduces major texts and current themes, from Joyce to the postcolonial, in Irish writing from 1800 to 2000. Meets mostly asynchronously and for an hour and a half, two days a week in the mornings.

ENGL 283 Life Writing (3)

MAYMESTER. Students will analyze and compose different forms of life writing such as autobiography, biography, and autoethnography. Readings will include theories of autobiography and selected literature.

ENGL 284 Reading Children’s Literature (3)

An overview of the tradition of children’s literature, considering the ways those books point to our basic assumptions about meaning, culture, self, society, gender, economics. Meets for an hour and a half, one day a week in the mornings.

Second Session, 2022

ENGL 100 Basic Writing (3)

Required for incoming students with SAT Evidence-Based Reading and Writing or ACT scores below a threshold set by the department. Please visit the department Web site for the most updated scores. The courses focuses on academic writing in a variety of contexts. Workshop format involves frequent writing and revision.

ENGL 105 English Composition and Rhetoric (3)

This college-level course focuses on written and oral argumentation, composition, research, information literacy, and rhetorical analysis. The course introduces students to the specific disciplinary contexts for written work and oral presentations required in college courses. Students may not receive credit for both ENGL 102 and ENGL 102I, 105, or 105I. Course utilizes computers.

ENGL 123 Introduction to Fiction (3)

Novels and shorter fiction by Defoe, Austen, Dickens, Faulkner, Wolfe, Fitzgerald, Joyce, and others.

ENGL 130 Introduction to Fiction Writing (3)

Intended for sophomores and first-year students. A writing-intensive introductory workshop in fiction. Close study of a wide range of short stories; emphasis on technical problems. Composition, discussion, and revision of original student stories. Students may not receive credit for both ENGL 130 and ENGL 132H. This course (or ENGL 132H) serves as a prerequisite for other courses in the fiction sequence of the creative writing program.

ENGL 140 Introduction to Gay and Lesbian Culture and Literature (WGST 140) (3)

ONLINE. Introduces students to concepts in queer theory and recent sexuality studies. Topics include queer lit, AIDS, race and sexuality, representations of gays and lesbians in the media, political activism/literature.

ENGL 141 World Literatures in English (3)

This course will be a basic introduction to literatures in English from Africa, the Caribbean, South Asia, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and other Anglophone literary traditions.

ENGL 143 Film and Culture (3)

Examines the ways culture shapes and is shaped by film. This course uses comparative methods to contrast films as historic or contemporary, mainstream or cutting-edge, in English or a foreign language, etc.

ENGL 146 Science Fiction/Fantasy/Utopia (3)

Readings in and theories of science fiction, utopian and dystopian literatures, and fantasy fiction.

ENGL 147 Mystery Fiction (3)

Studies in classic and contemporary mystery and detective fiction.

ENGL 148 Horror (3)

This course examines the complexities and pleasures of horror, from its origins in Gothic and pre-Gothic literatures and arts. Topics include psychology, aesthetics, politics, allegory, ideology, and ethics.

ENGL 149 Digital and Multimedia Composition (3)

In this class students will practice composing in contemporary digital writing spaces. Students will study theories of electronic networks and mediation, and their connections to literacy, creativity, and collaboration. Students will also develop their own multimedia projects using images, audio, video, and words. Topics include the rhetoric of the Internet, online communities, and digital composition. Meets mostly asynchronously and for two days a week in the morning.

ENGL 155 The Visual and Graphic Narrative (3)

This course examines various visual texts, including graphic novels and emerging narrative forms, and explores how meaning is conveyed through composition, the juxtaposition and framing of images, and the relationship between words and images. Students create their own visual narratives.

ENGL 269 Introduction to Disability Studies (3)

This course will introduce students to the key critical concepts, debates, and questions of practice in the emerging scholarly field of disability studies.