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Classics

212 Murphey Hall, CB# 3145
(919) 962-7191

First Session, 2022

CLAR/ARTH 242 Egyptian Art and Archaeology. (3)

MAYMESTER. A survey of the archaeological remains of ancient Egypt, from the earliest settlements of the Neolithic period until the end of the New Kingdom.
This course is an introductory survey of the archaeology, art and architecture of ancient Egypt, ranging in time from the prehistoric cultures of the Nile Valley through the New Kingdom. While the course will examine famous features and characters of ancient Egypt it will also provide a wide-ranging review of the archaeology of this remarkable land, including questions of ethics and the role of colonialism in the formation of the discipline. Online section available.

CLAR 120 Mediterranean, Near Eastern and Egyptian Archaeology (3)

ONLINE. An introduction to Mediterranean archaeology through the examination of archaeological sites from the Neolithic period (ca. 9000 BCE) to the Roman Empire (fourth century CE). The sites, geographic and cultural areas, and chronological periods of study vary depending on instructor. Does not satisfy classical archaeology major requirements. Honors version available.
This course is an introduction to Mediterranean archaeology, surveying archaeological sites from the Neolithic period (ca. 9000 BCE) to Late Antiquity (ca. 400 CE). We will begin with the earliest known settlements in Western Asia and trace urbanization throughout the Mediterranean basin, including Egypt and Mesopotamia, into Imperial and Late Antique Rome, exploring the origins of cities and states, and the diverse trajectories and development of complex societies. What are the historical origins of cities? What sparked the urbanization process? How were ancient cities organized, and how were they different from the urban centers today?

CLAS 121 The Greeks (3)

Introduction to the history, literature, religion, philosophy, science, art and architecture of Greece from Homer to Alexander the Great. Emphasis on primary sources. Honors version available.
This course will explore ancient Greek ideas on war, history, art, philosophy, and more through primary sources such as Homer’s Iliad and Sophocles’ Ajax, as well as visual mediums such as vase paintings. In this course, students have the opportunity to investigate how the Greeks viewed their world and to interact with the fascinating world of Greek literature. Students are encouraged to offer their own insight and relate the material to their own experiences. Some questions we will consider: What was important to the Greeks? How did Greeks view outsiders? How does Greek art and literature impact our lives?

CLAS 126 Medical Etymology (3)

Systematic study of the formation of medical terms from Greek and Latin roots, to build vocabulary and recognition. For general etymology see CLAS 125.
This course will consist of systematic study of the formation of medical terms from Greek and Latin. You will develop the long-term skills you need to understand the language of the medical profession by (1) building a vocabulary of root words, and (2) learning how these root words are the building blocks of medical terminology. You will gain not only an extensive knowledge of medical vocabulary, but also the ability to understand medical language from form to function throughout your entire career.

Second Session, 2022

CLAS 122 The Romans (3)

A survey of Roman civilization from the beginning to the late empire, dealing with history, literature, art and architecture, philosophy and religion, and social and political institutions. Honors version available.
The aim of this course is to introduce students to some peculiar features of Roman civilization and challenge some of our perceptions of antiquity. Within a broadly historical framework we will look at various aspects of Roman society and address questions like, who were the Romans? What was it like to be a Roman aristocrat, soldier, slave or woman? How does some of our surviving evidence inform or challenge these interpretations? To respond to these questions, we will read ancient sources dealing with politics, literature, religion, technology, social institutions, and war. Texts will range across epic (Vergil’s Aeneid, Ovid’s Metamorphoses), history (Sallust, Tacitus), pastoral poetry and more. LATE AFTERNOON.

CLAS 126 Medical Word Formation and Etymology (3)

Systematic study of the formation of medical terms from Greek and Latin roots, to build vocabulary and recognition. For general etymology see CLAS 125.
This course will consist of systematic study of the formation of medical terms from Greek and Latin. You will develop the long-term skills you need to understand the language of the medical profession by (1) building a vocabulary of root words, and (2) learning how these root words are the building blocks of medical terminology. You will gain not only an extensive knowledge of medical vocabulary, but also the ability to understand medical language from form to function throughout your entire career.

CLAS 131 Classical Mythology (3)

ONLINE. An introduction to the mythology of the ancient Greek and Roman world. Readings may include selections from Homer, Hesiod, Greek tragedy, and Vergil. Honors version available.
This course is an introduction to the myths of the ancient Greeks and Romans, the stories about gods, goddesses, and heroes that were told and retold throughout antiquity in the Mediterranean. Our goal is not simply to become familiar with these stories, but more importantly to explore their significance in the wider context of ancient Greek and Roman civilization. What functions did these myths have in their original contexts? What can we learn from them about the way that the ancient Greeks and Romans understood their world? And what in turn can we learn from them about the way that we understand our own world? In our explorations we will concentrate on ancient literary texts, especially epic and tragedy, but we will also consider ancient art and material culture as well as modern retellings of Greco-Roman myth.

CLAS 263 Athletics in the Greek and Roman World (3)

Study of athletics as a unifying force in ancient society, emphasizing the Olympic games and other religious festivals. Consideration of athletic professionalism, propaganda, and social trends using literary and archaeological sources. Honors version available.
This course examines the athletic cultures of Greece and Rome from the age of Homer to the end of the (Western) Roman Empire. Students consider the mechanics and logistics of ancient events, taking up larger questions of cultural interpretation by situating ancient athletic practice within religious, social, and political contexts. By pursuing a variety of theoretical approaches, students gain insight into many distinctive features of organized sport across time. Questions to be considered include: What legacies and lessons have ancient athletics left for the modern world? How did the ideals embodied in Greek and Roman sport relate to the myths and cultural practices of those eras? In what ways—if at all—were Greek and Roman athletic ideals unique? What differences existed between professional and amateur athletes, and how does this inform modern debates? In short: What can we learn about a society from its sports?