242 Center for Dramatic Art, CB# 3230
(919) 962-1132

FIRST SESSION, 2017

DRAM 170 The Playful Actor: Theatre Games and Improvisation (3). MAYMESTER.  This course seeks to strengthen the powers of imagination, courage, spontaneity, and presence of the actor through theatre games and improvisation. This course can prove invaluable for the acting student, but also for anyone who wishes to be a more engaged, fearless, and creative human being.  No pre-requisite or acting experience required.

DRAM 245 Acting for the Camera (3). MAYMESTER.  The process of acting and its relationship to the technical and artistic demands of television/film production. Problems of continuity and out-of-sequence filming. Concentration and thinking on camera. This highly experiential course integrates skills that cover a wide range of the entertainment industry. Along with on-camera acting techniques, this course exposes how many career paths are available to actors AND non-actors in the TV/Film industry by guiding students in the execution of various production roles as we shoot scenes. The class recreates an authentic film set by using professional-grade lighting and camera equipment as well as operating at a pace similar to realistic shoots.

The students will take on various roles: Producer, Product Client, Advertising Representative, Host, Screenwriter, Camera-Operator, etc. It is hands-on, furious in pace, and culminates into several video files of various styles including TV commercials and scenes from TV and film. The students will be given full access to their files for reference and to share with friends and family. Students of all majors and any experience level are encouraged to enroll. No pre-requisite necessary for Summer School.

This class will collaborate with the Maymester course, DRAM 300 Directing, with Julie Fishell, and with DRAM 290 – Special Studies:  Writing the Half-Hour Comedy for Television (Staff) with guest UNC Celebrity Alumnus, Brian Hargrove. Mr. Hargrove is an award-winning screenwriter based in Los Angeles who has written for highly successful TV productions and films.

DRAM 260 Advanced Stagecraft (3). MAYMESTER.  The course provides practical applications of principles and techniques used in technical theatre. Lectures are supported by individually scheduled workshop sessions where techniques are applied to a theatrical production. Students will learn the structure, tools, and safety aspects of the scene shop.  They will then apply these skills while designing and building half-size scenery for a chosen play.

DRAM 287 African American Theatre (3).  ONLINE. This course investigates the history and legacy of African American drama through the study of its literary texts, performance styles, and cultural history.

DRAM 290 – Special Topics in Dramatic Art “Writing the Half-hour Comedy for Television” With Special Guest Brian Hargrove (3).  MAYMESTER. The study of a topic in dramaturgy, theatrical design, or theatrical production. Content and instructor will vary. May be repeated for credit.

Being a television writer is one of the most exciting, fast paced, emotionally and artistically rewarding, not to mention lucrative, careers you can possibly imagine.  It is also one of the most demanding, time consuming and competitive professions in the Entertainment Industry.   This class has been designed to simulate a professional Writers’ Room to give students a chance to experience what it’s like to be a writer on staff of a half-hour situation comedy.   Using lecture, series clips, class discussion, and analysis of colleagues’ written work, the course will teach students how to recognize a good idea for a series; develop the idea into a story; break and outline that story into acts, scenes and beats; write and re-write a script based on the outline; write and rewrite a second draft; and participate in a group rewrite to prepare a final draft that will be filmed with students from DRAM 245-Acting for the Camera and by students taking DRAM 300-Directing.

This will be a full production, and it will give writers the opportunity to be involved in casting, editing scenes live in rehearsals and on-set, and collaborating with the actors and directors, who will be bringing their words to life.   This class will be hugely collaborative and integrative while being conducted in a professional atmosphere, and it will involve a lot of writing, writing, writing and, oh, what’s the word… writing!    But above all, it will be a lot of fun.

Students of all majors and any experience level are encourage to enroll.

DRAM 300 Directing (3). MAYMESTER.  An introductory course in the principles of stage directing; analysis for concept, organization of production; and methodology of staging. Students will work alone and in groups to explore improvised events and scripted scenes. Primary focus on principles and approaches to staging and organization of production.

This class will collaborate with the Maymester course, Directing 245 Acting for the Camera, with John Patrick, and with DRAM 290 – Writing the Half-Hour Comedy for Television (Staff), with guest UNC Celebrity Alumnus, Brian Hargrove.  Mr. Hargrove is an award-winning screenwriter based in Los Angeles who has written for highly successful TV productions and films.

SECOND SESSION, 2017

DRAM 120 Play Analysis (3). Development of the skill to analyze plays for academic and production purposes through the intensive study of representative plays.

DRAM 135 Acting for Non-Majors (3). Introduction to basic processes and techniques of acting for the stage.

DRAM 287 African American Theatre (3). ONLINE.  This course investigates the history and legacy of African American drama through the study of its literary texts, performance styles, and cultural history.