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FIRST SESSION, 2017

CHIN 150 Introduction to Chinese Civilization (3). A course designed to introduce students to the Chinese world of past and present. Chinese civilization is explored from a variety of perspectives: political, social, cultural, intellectual, and economic.

DRAM 287 African American Theatre (3). This course investigates the history and legacy of African American drama through the study of its literary texts, performance styles, and cultural history.

EDUC 689 Foundations of Special Education (3). This course will provide an advanced introduction to key concepts, issues, and service delivery approaches pertaining to the educational needs of students with high incidence disabilities.

EDMX 782  Behavioral Support Methods (3).  Prerequisite: Admission to Special Education: General Curriculum Licensure Program. Not open to others outside program.  Emphasizes effective behavior management and applied behavior analysis techniques for intervening in the environments of exceptional children to increase learning.

ENEC 309 Environmental Values and Valuation (3). Introduction to the methods for assigning value to aspects of the environment and to interhuman and human-environment interactions. The approach is interdisciplinary, drawing on methods from philosophy, ecology, psychology, aesthetics, economics, religion, etc. Online. Computer equipped with internet access required. Course flyer.

ENGL 140 Intro to Gay & Lesbian Literature (WMST) (3). Introduces students to concepts in queer theory and recent sexuality studies. Topics include queer lit, AIDS, race and sexuality, representations of gays and lesbians in the media, political activism/literature.

ENGL 144 Popular Genres (3). Introductory course on popular literary genres. Students will read and discuss works in the area of mystery, romance, westerns, science fiction, children’s literature, and horror fiction.

ENGL 146 Science Fiction/Fantasy/Utopia (3). Readings in and theories of science fiction, utopian and dystopian literatures, and fantasy fiction.

INLS 513 Resource Selection and Evaluation (3). Identification, provision, and evaluation of resources to meet primary needs of clientele in different institutional environments.

INLS 523 Introduction to Database Concepts and Applications (3). Prerequisite: INLS 161 for undergraduates. Design and implementation of basic database systems. Semantic modeling, relational database theory, including normalization, indexing, and query construction, SQL.

INLS 585 Management for Information Professionals (3).  An introduction to general management principles and practices intended for information professionals working in all types of organizations. Topics include planning, budgeting, organizational theory, staffing, leadership, organizational change, and decision making.

MATH 307 Revisiting Real Numbers and Algebra (3). Central to teaching precollege mathematics is the need for an in-depth understanding of real numbers and algebra.  This course explores this content, emphasizing problem solving and mathematical reasoning.

MEJO 153 Writing and Reporting (3). A laboratory course that teaches journalistic skills essential to writing across platforms. Practice in using news gathering tools, such as sourcing and interviewing techniques; writing stories, including leads, organization, quotations, and data; editing for grammar, punctuation, brevity, style, and accuracy; and critical thinking about news values and audiences.

MEJO 187 Introduction to Interactive Media. (3). Permission of the School. Entry-level course in multimedia storytelling that includes modules on theory; the profession; design; content gathering; and editing, programming, publishing, and usability.

MEJO 340 Introduction to Media Law: Journalism Focus (3). Prerequisite, MEJO 153. Focuses on speech and press freedoms under the First Amendment. Topics include prior restraint, libel, privacy, protection of anonymous sources, free press-fair trial, federal regulation of electronic and new media, freedom of information, intellectual property, and international issues.

MEJO 390 Visual Communication Entrepreneurship (3). Students gain an understanding of visual communication entrepreneurship. The course will utilize online learning tools to give students the skills and concepts necessary to manage a photography/video production business.

MEJO 441 Diversity and Communication (3). An examination of racial stereotypes and minority portrayals in United States culture and communication. Emphasis is on the portrayal of Native Americans, African Americans, Hispanics, and Asian Americans in the mass media.

MEJO 442 Gender, Class, Race, and Mass Media (WMST 442) (3). The media play a critical role in the construction and contestation of ideas about gender, class, and race. Using a range of methods, students will analyze media messages past and present to understand how gender, race, and class influence media production and consumption.

MEJO 715 New Media and Society (3). This course examines digital environments from diverse conceptual perspectives (e.g., journalism, mass communication, psychology, information science and technology, sociology, business) and outlines theoretical implications and practical applications of new media. MATC students only.

MEJO 890 Digital Data and Analytics (3). This course explores the fundamental concepts and principles that underlie techniques for extracting useful information and knowledge from digital data. The primary goal of the course is to help you view problems from a data perspective and understand how to systematically analyze such problems. Certificate Students Only. 

RELI 162 Catholicism Today:  An Introduction to the Contemporary Catholic Church (3).  This course provides students with a first glimpse and insight into the Catholic tradition, past, present, and future: its beliefs, structure, aims, successes, and failures.

RELI 201 Ancient Biblical Interpretation (3).  The course looks at the origins of biblical interpretation, how the Hebrew Bible was interpreted around the turn of the Common Era, the key formative period for early Christianity and rabbinic Judaism. We consider the nature of interpretation as an endeavor, as well as how the Bible came to be viewed as Scripture.

SOCI 277 Societies and Genomics (3). The course examines how human genomic information can be incorporated into social sciences. Topics include twin studies; an introduction to basic principles of molecular genetics; evolutionary psychology; sex, gender and genomics; ethical issues in genetic studies; and epigenetics.

SOWO 700 ATOD: Abuse and Dependence (3). This course is designed to introduce the field of substance abuse to social workers. It will provide specific information regarding the use, abuse, and dependency issues related to chemical substances and an overview of the policy and practice issues related to working with substance abusers and their families.

SOWO 730 Social Work and the Law (3). Course provides familiarity with legal processes, legal research, and legal analysis within the context of socio-legal issues important to social work practice.

SOWO 834 Advanced Policy Practice (1.5). Advanced Policy Practice focuses on skills development in advanced policy analysis and change at administrative and legislative levels and on multiple levels of advocacy and lobbying strategies.

SECOND SESSION, 2017

ASIA 106 Israeli Popular Culture: The Case of Music (3).  An introduction to Israeli popular culture, with a transnational and interdisciplinary frame. Focusing on Israeli music, exploring its different genres and the cultural richness developed since Zionism, reaching along the way a broad understanding of Israeli society. Students may not receive credit for both ASIA 53 and ASIA 106.

AMST 110 Introduction to the Cultures and Histories of Native North America (HIST 110). (3). An interdisciplinary introduction to Native American history and studies. The course uses history, literature, art, and cultural studies to study the Native American experience

DRAM 287 African American Theatre (3). This course investigates the history and legacy of African American drama through the study of its literary texts, performance styles, and cultural history.

EDUC 390 Special Topics in Education: Math for Elementary Teachers (3). Course helps students review for the Mathematics Subtest (which consists of 45 items and is a 3-hour assessment). This is a 3-credit course and may not be used to fulfill any undergraduate or graduate program requirements.

EDUC 689 Foundations of Special Education (3). Prerequisite class for some SPED students.  This course will provide an advanced introduction to key concepts, issues, and service delivery approaches pertaining to the educational needs of students with high incidence disabilities.

EDUC 706 Collaboration and Leadership in School Counseling (3). Students are required to have taken 18 hours in counseling courses.  Emphasizes the collaboration and leadership skills needed to effectively organize and implement a comprehensive school counseling program.

ENGL 123 Introduction to Fiction (3). Novels and shorter fiction by Defoe, Austen, Dickens, Faulkner, Wolfe, Fitzgerald, Joyce, and others.

ENGL 124 Contemporary Literature (3). The literature of the present generation.

ENGL 155 The Visual and Graphic Narrative (3). This course examines a number of visual texts, including graphic novels and emerging narrative forms that include visuals as well as words. The course explores how meaning can be conveyed through the composition, juxtaposition, and framing of images as well as through the relationship between words and images.

INLS 501 Information Resources and Services (3). Analysis, use, and evaluation of information and reference systems, services, and tools for both printed and electronic delivery. Provides a foundation in electronic information search techniques, question negotiation, interviewing, and instruction.

INLS 585 Management for Information Professionals (3). An introduction to general management principles and practices intended for information professionals working in all types of organizations. Topics include planning, budgeting, organizational theory, staffing, leadership, organizational change, and decision making.

INLS 725 Electronic Health Records (3). Focuses on EHR data standards with emphasis on data management requirements, applications, and services. Course includes HL7, CCHIT, and CDISC standards. For data management specialists, administrators, and health data analysts.

MEJO 153 Writing and Reporting (3). A laboratory course that teaches journalistic skills essential to writing across platforms. Practice in using news gathering tools, such as sourcing and interviewing techniques; writing stories, including leads, organization, quotations, and data; editing for grammar, punctuation, brevity, style, and accuracy; and critical thinking about news values and audiences.

POLI 433 Politics of the European Union (3). Examines the politics and political economy of institutional change and policy making in the European Union in comparative perspective.

PSYC 220 Biopsychology (3). Prerequisite, PSYC 101.  Study of the biological basis of behavior. Emphasis will be placed on human findings and applications.

PSYC 260 Social Psychology (3). Prerequisite, PSYC 101. Introductory survey of experimental social psychology covering attitudes, interpersonal processes, and small groups.

RELI 283 The Buddhist Tradition:  India, Nepal, and Tibet (ASIA 300) (3).  Examines the diverse beliefs, practices, and cultures associated with Buddhism in the Himalayan regions of India, Nepal, and Tibet. Topics include Buddhism’s development and spread, the cultural dynamics of Himalayan societies, monasticism, folk religion, revivalism, tourism, gender, globalization, and the role of the state in shaping Buddhist life and culture.

SOWO 831 Substance Abuse Policy (1.5). Students will examine federal and state policy trends regarding substance use and addiction. Students will critically evaluate policies and their influence on access to care, criminalization, treatment, and social justice.

SPAN 260 Introduction to Spanish and Spanish American Literature (3). Prerequisite, SPAN 204, 212, or 402. Develops skills for further literary studies while increasing Spanish language proficiency and providing different world views through literature. Native speakers need permission of the instructor. Students may not receive credit for both SPAN 260 and SPAN 262.

SPAN 300 Spanish Composition and Grammar Review (3).  Prerequisite, SPAN 250, 255, 260, or equivalent. Intensive grammar review and composition designed to improve accuracy and develop writing skills, using process and task-oriented approaches. Students may not receive credit for both SPAN 300 and SPAN 326.

SPAN 344 Latin American Cultural Topics (3). Prerequisite, SPAN 300, 320, 321, 322, 323, or 326. This course studies trends in thought, art, film, music, social practices, in the Spanish speaking Americas, including the United States. Topics may include colonialism, race, class, ethnicity, modernization, ecology, religion, gender, and popular culture.